Lagos 2050: How should Africa's biggest city prepare for doubling in size?

So your city is about to double in size, and it’s happening whether you like it or not. Infrastructure will be strained, sanitation is a concern and children need educating. What do you do?
Read More »

2050 population explosion: Is Nigeria ready for 397 million people.

By 2050, Nigeria, currently the seventh most populous country in the world, will rise to the fourth spot with an estimated 397 million people, the Population Reference Bureau has said.
Read More »

Scientists squabble while Africa's only penguins perish.

They’re cute, knee-high, they bray like donkeys and are a tourist attraction near Cape Town. But African Penguins – the continent’s only species of the flightless bird – are at risk of extinction.
Read More »

Texas teenager creates $20 water purifier to tackle toxic e-waste pollution.

A new filtering device, invented by a U.S. teenager, could provide a cheap and easy way to purify water.
Read More »

Latest PCB fix in Michigan's St. Clair Shores creates little hope.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have contaminated two of the city’s canals leading to Lake St. Clair since 2001, keeping residents from swimming or fishing and raising fears about the loss of home value.
Read More »

Chicago River still teems with fecal bacteria, tests show.

While Mayor Rahm Emanuel is fond of calling the river Chicago’s "next recreational frontier," the partially treated wastewater that pours constantly into its channels poses stomach-churning health risks to people who come in contact with the murky flow.
Read More »

Rivers of red threaten the future of the reef.

It’s going to take the reinvention of 10,000 farms to improve water quality and repair the Great Barrier Reef.
Read More »

Mapped: The countries that will face the biggest water shortages by 2040.

Water shortages are likely to become increasingly common as the world faces climate change and an increasing population – but which countries will be hit hardest?
Read More »

Vegan party running federal election candidate in B.C.

A party promoting a vegan lifestyle to save animals and the planet is fielding its first candidate in B.C.
Read More »

A patch of the Bronx where the corn is as high as a cabdriver' eye.

The farm in the Bronx began about 15 years ago with a few tomatoes and beans planted along a thin, unused strip of land behind a 30-story apartment building. It has grown into a thicket that stretches about a quarter-mile.
Read More »

California grape grower raises alarm over Northwestern Pacific Railroad's herbicide spraying.

The case could have far-reaching implications for those with property along the tracks. Rail activities, including weed abatement, could come under greater scrutiny depending on the outcome of the investigation.
Read More »

Big plans, big questions on Lake Champlain cleanup policies.

In a packed ballroom in South Burlington’s DoubleTree Hotel, a well-known scientist studying Lake Champlain stood up and told state officials that some of the targets they’ve set to reduce pollution into the lake simply cannot be reached.
Read More »

Things to know: EPA water rules take effect in some states.

New federal rules to protect smaller streams, tributaries and wetlands took effect on Friday — but only in some states.
Read More »

McClellan Air Force Base officials meet with residents over chromium 6 concerns.

Some neighbors in Rio Linda, California, think Chromium 6 that may have traveled into their groundwater from McClellan has caused cancer.
Read More »

Evidence supports trawling depth limit.

The first scientific evidence that trawling in waters deeper than 600 metres is ecologically damaging and provides poor economic return is reigniting debate about the controversial fishing practice.
Read More »

FDA warns 3 tobacco makers about language used on labels.

The F.D.A. issued warnings to the makers of Natural American Spirit, Winston and Nat Sherman cigarettes about their use of “additive-free” or “natural” in marketing.
Read More »

What household dust says about you.

New research could shed light on the impact that dust microbes can have on human health, researchers say.
Read More »

The last ice area in the Arctic.

Where once the Arctic was an almost eternally frozen region, global warming has created vast changes.
Read More »

Gabon: Protecting vital forests, and communities.

The west African nation is working to balance competing demands of retaining biodiversity and mitigating climate change with the immediate needs of its people.
Read More »

Disappearing sea ice forces thousands of walruses to haul out on the coast of Alaska.

This is the seventh time in nine years that walruses have been expelled from the Chukchi Sea by dwindling sea ice.
Read More »

Australia's pollution level seen rising beyond Abbott's target.

Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions are likely to rise in the next 15 years, missing by a wide margin a target proposed for United Nations talks on global warming, a team of researchers said.
Read More »

Africa must harvest rains to feed growing population.

Africa must harvest its rain to cope with droughts and irrigate crops for a "green revolution" to feed its growing population, experts told a global water conference in the Swedish capital.
Read More »

Water, climate, energy intertwined with fight against poverty in Central America.

Central America’s toolbox to pull 23 million people – almost half of the population – out of poverty must include three indispensable tools: universal access to water, a sustainable power supply, and adaptation to climate change.
Read More »

Rising sea level threatens coastal restoration, New Orleans levees, scientists say.

Even as Louisiana embarks on a multi-billion-dollar program to begin rebuilding its coast, evidence continues to mount that new coastal land will have to contend with rapid rises in sea level.
Read More »

These are the cities most vulnerable to the next Katrina.

Where should we expect the next Hurricane Katrina to hit? Despite 10 years of work and some $15 billion in investment in disaster preparedness, experts say we may still want to look to New Orleans.
Read More »

Rich nations' climate plans fall short of hopes for Paris summit.

Developed nations are on track to cut their greenhouse emissions by almost 30 percent by 2030, Reuters calculations show, falling far short of a halving suggested by a U.N. panel of scientists.
Read More »

Walruses in the Arctic are running out of sea ice this year — again.

Diminishing sea ice in the Chukchi sea could be pointing toward another massive walrus haul-out in Alaska, which is dangerous for the animals.
Read More »

Study: Europe's boars bolstered by climate change.

Over the last three decades, Europe’s wild boar population has continued to rise. New research suggests their numbers have been buoyed by mild winters brought on by climate change.
Read More »

Scientists foresee losses as cities fight beach erosion.

Beaches are facing off against a changing climate, and they’re losing ground. Literally.
Read More »

Muslim scholars prepare call for action on climate change.

Islamic scholars and religious leaders are preparing a call for action on climate change that will say it’s the religious duty of the world’s 1.6 billion Muslims to fight global warming.
Read More »

Global warming seen lurking behind this summer’s deadly heat waves.

Temperature records have fallen on several continents, making the summer of 2015 stand out from others that featured record-smashing and deadly heat events.
Read More »

Snyder's Flats transforms from aggregate pit to ecosystem.

Decades of rehabilitation have transformed Snyder’s Flats from an aggregate pit into a vibrant ecosystem with at least 30 species of fish.
Read More »

Tesoro settles Martinez, California, refinery pollution suit for $4 million.

Texas-based oil manufacturer Tesoro Corp. has agreed to pay $4 million to settle a lawsuit claiming the company spewed smog- and ozone-producing pollutants at its refinery in Martinez.
Read More »

Bill to protect central Idaho mountains clears Congress.

A decadelong push to protect central Idaho’s Boulder-White Clouds region came to a close yesterday.
Read More »

Ebola rates plummet, but WHO says more to come.

Ebola cases have plummeted in the three West African countries hit by the worst epidemic ever of the virus, but health officials say it’s not over yet.
Read More »

Ocean acidification will last long after carbon clean-up efforts begin.

Hopes that future efforts to extract excess carbon dioxide from the atmosphere could spare the planet the worst impacts of climate change have been dimmed by a new study.
Read More »

Half a billion dollars gets you a gentler climate plan.

There could be half a billion reasons for the concessions President Barack Obama’s clean-power plan made to a defiant energy industry.
Read More »

North Carolina officials tout wind farm deal.

A conservative Southern river town has become a prime example of the innovative energy technology that the Obama administration is now aggressively pursuing.
Read More »

What does the transatlantic trade deal mean for renewable energy?

Trade partnership between the EU and U.S. could remove barriers facing the green energy sector, but experts warn of potential dangers.
Read More »

Carbon pollution from US power plants hits 27-year low.

The government says heat-trapping pollution from U.S. power plants hit a 27-year low in April.
Read More »

US tax incentives and laws to recycle mountains of food.

Three New England states may have found an avenue to address both waste and hunger at once. Their solution—regulate the amount of food that businesses can throw away.
Read More »

South L.A. residents ask pope to intervene in fight over oil operation.

Residents of a low-income South Los Angeles community are asking Pope Francis to intervene with the Los Angeles Archdiocese to prevent an oil operation from reopening two years after its noxious emissions sickened neighbors.
Read More »

Soil scientists enthusiastic about future of sustainable agriculture.

We are halfway through the International Year of Soil, and Australian soil scientists are brimming with enthusiasm, a contrast to the doomsayers.
Read More »

12 surprising ways to use the cow, without eating a bite.

Heard of the whole hog? How about the whole cow? Using beef production byproducts could turn an environmentally unsound industry into a more sustainable economic source.
Read More »

Are ‘superfoods’ over?

A closer look at a wildly popular, totally unregulated food label.
Read More »

Pennsylvania golf course joins movement to help the honeybees.

The quarter-acre of wildflowers, adjacent to the 15th green at Allentown Municipal Golf Course, used to be a pile of dirt. Once an eyesore, this plot of land now is part of an international program to restore the honeybee population.
Read More »

The other reason for building greener workplaces.

Evidence is mounting that green buildings have a positive effect on health outcomes for tenants, but more research is needed.
Read More »

Newspapers can predict obesity so don’t say we never did anything for you.

If you’re looking for a way to predict future obesity trends, maybe you should buy a newspaper. I promise this post is not just a lame attempt to keep my profession afloat. It’s not!
Read More »

Fukushima scrub-down aims to make villages safe, although woods may remain no-go zones.

Sweating inside their plastic protection suits, thousands of men toil in Japan’s muggy early summer in a vast effort to scrub radiation from the villages around Fukushima.
Read More »

Interior allows Shell to drill in Arctic, with limits.

The Interior Department gave Shell approval Wednesday for exploratory drilling at two sites in the Chukchi Sea.
Read More »

North Carolina state lawmaker offers plan to delay action on EPA rules.

A North Carolina senator introduced legislation on Wednesday to block state agencies from taking action on expected EPA rules to cut carbon emissions on power plants.
Read More »

Industrial pollution threatens European porpoises.

The marine mammals around parts of the British Isles are struggling to successfully reproduce as a result of chemical pollutants found in European waters.
Read More »

Montana utility rate increase based on disputed pollution terms.

Eastern Montana electric bills could rise $178 a year to cover the costs of expensive pollution controls that may have been unnecessary.
Read More »

In Yemen’s grinding war, if the bombs don’t get you, the water shortages will.

Attacks and lack of fuel disrupt Yemen’s water system, leaving many thirsty or unable to wash.
Read More »

Leachate pollutes Sai Gon river water.

The Sai Gon River, which provides water to millions of Vietnam residents, is polluted not only from untreated industrial waste water and domestic garbage, but leachate from waste disposal areas as well.
Read More »

A chemical attack that killed a countryside and scarred a people.

Mangroves are sturdy trees. It is perhaps their sturdiness that led mangroves to be one of the most significant targets in the Vietnam War.
Read More »

Former Pompton Lakes mayor returns for book signing.

Former mayor John Sinsimer will return to the borough to discuss his first novel, "The Brook," a novel based on the poisoning of Pompton Lakes by a Dupont munitions factory.
Read More »

GMO rice could reduce greenhouse gas emissions, study says.

Over half the people on the planet eat rice as a staple food. Growing rice emits methane, a potent greenhouse gas—to the tune of 25 million to 100 million metric tons of methane every year., Over half the people on the planet eat rice, which emits methane, a potent greenhouse gas. GMOs could change...
Read More »

The godfather of global warming's frightening prediction is getting the cold shoulder.

James Hansen’s conclusions are frightening, and in some ways compelling—but they are not widely shared in the climate science community., James Hansen’s conclusions are frightening—but they are not widely shared in the climate science community.
Read More »

Global warming deniers are an endangered species.

The political and social climate is shifting, and those in denial about human-caused climate change are struggling to adapt.
Read More »

More from environmentalhealthnews.

Killing Field: One Worker Killed, Another Injured in Falls from New Vikings Stadium Roof

Two workers from Berwald Roofing were injured – one fatally – when they fell while performing roofing work on the north side of the new U.S. Bank Stadium, future...
Read More »

Measuring the Safety Climate at Your Facility

Safety climate is considered a leading safety indicator by experts, but what is it and how do you measure it? Does your company have a strong emphasis on safety...
Read More »

Tianjin Blasts Chinese Safety into the Limelight

John Hitch, New Equipment Digest The Tianjin explosions could be a major turning point for China, much in the way the Cuyahoga River fire in Cleveland was for America....
Read More »

OSHA Develops New Process for Resolving Whistleblower Complaints

After piloting the program in two regions, OSHA is rolling it out to all of its regions. After piloting the program in two regions, OSHA is rolling it out...
Read More »

Chicken Processor Faces $861K in OSHA Fines for Exposing Workers to Hazards

OSHA inspectors found that workers at Case Farms Processing continue to be exposed to serious amputation, electrocution and fall hazards. Case Farms Processing is no stranger to OSHA, having...
Read More »

OSHA Updates National Emphasis Program on Amputations

The National Emphasis Program targets industries with high numbers and high rates of amputations. According to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics data, manufacturing employers report that 2,000...
Read More »

Join EHS, MHL and ITA Members for a Twitter Chat on Forklift Safety, Use #ForkliftSafety

We encourage you to join the Twitter chat Sept. 15th, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. Please use #ForkliftSafety at the end of all your tweets. And for a...
Read More »

Jail Time: Paying the Price for Poor Safety Practices

Joseph Appel The owner of a construction company and his project manager were found guilty of manslaughter and sentenced to prison following a Latino construction worker’s death. The owner...
Read More »

Death on the Job: Putting Names and Faces on Fatality Statistics

The total number of work-related fatalities is likely to reach 4,500 again this year, with 50,000 additional deaths attributed to occupational illness, and a database humanizes those numbers. Criminal...
Read More »

Employee Loses Four Fingers on First Day

Employee suffers a “preventable” injury thanks to a lack of safety training, OSHA says. Employee suffers a “preventable” injury thanks to a lack of safety training, OSHA says. read...
Read More »

Rainforests doomed unless world adopts ‘development without destruction’, warn scientists

Tropical forests face a dire future unless humans adopt a radically different approach to protecting and managing them, warns a review published last week in the journal Science. The...
Read More »

400+ dams could irrevocably harm Amazon ecology — but solutions exist

Dams and reservoirs affect fish and other riverine fauna by creating barriers to movement, both upstream and downstream. Many fish in the Amazon migrate thousands of miles as part...
Read More »

The many paths towards sustainable palm oil in India

This is the second of a two-part series on palm oil in India. Read the first part here. Love it or hate it, palm oil is likely here to...
Read More »

Indonesian village opts to protect mangroves, preserve livelihoods

Preserving mangrove forests is instrumental to bringing down emissions rates in Indonesia, a leading carbon polluter. Residents of Deaga village in North Sulawesi province also believe it is key to safeguarding...
Read More »

Radiation Expert: Horrific health toll from Fukushima — “Impossible not to be moved by scale of deaths and suffering” — Thousands to die of cancer and that’s just the tip of the iceberg — Number of dead babies significantly increased in many areas of Japan — Government actions unconscionable (AUDIO)

Radiation Expert: Horrific health toll from Fukushima — “Impossible not to be moved by scale of deaths and suffering” — Thousands to die of cancer and that’s just the tip of the iceberg — Number of dead babies significantly increased in many areas of Japan — Government actions unconscionable (AUDIO)


Read More »

Environmental Groups Threaten To Sue EPA Over Fracking Wastewater Rules – Huffington Post

Environmental Groups Threaten To Sue EPA Over Fracking Wastewater Rules – Huffington Post

Huffington Post Environmental Groups Threaten To Sue EPA Over Fracking Wastewater RulesHuffington PostThe organizations — which include the Environmental Integrity Project and the Natural Resources Defense Council — will...
Read More »

Who's more trustworthy on environmental protections, the state or the EPA? – Greensboro News & Record (blog)

Who's more trustworthy on environmental protections, the state or the EPA? – Greensboro News & Record (blog)

Greensboro News & Record (blog) Who’s more trustworthy on environmental protections, the state or the EPA?Greensboro News & Record (blog)I raise the question because of a news release issued...
Read More »

Slashed environmental funding could lead to EPA takeover or sky-rocketing … – AL.com

Slashed environmental funding could lead to EPA takeover or sky-rocketing …AL.comThe amount of money Alabama is willing to spend on environmental management appears poised to go from slim to...
Read More »

Free Webinar: Life Cycle Assessment as a Green Chemistry Tool: How to use LCA as a resource for minimizing environmental and toxicological impacts.

Free Webinar: Life Cycle Assessment as a Green Chemistry Tool: How to use LCA as a resource for minimizing environmental and toxicological impacts.

​Join us for aNational Pollution Prevention Roundtable and Safer Chemistry Challenge Program webinar on September 1st, 2 pm eastern Title: Life Cycle Assessment as a Green Chemistry Tool: How...
Read More »

Hundreds of new Amazon dams an “ecological experiment” on global scale

A boom in dam construction is sweeping the Neotropical regions of the world. In the Amazon, the world’s largest and arguably most ecologically important river basin, hundreds of dams...
Read More »

GigaPan: Providing big picture context to conservation science without sacrificing the details

Scale has traditionally been one of the most challenging aspects of science and conservation photography. Detail is almost always important to scientists, but macro images lack the context and...
Read More »

Food Wastage Footprint 2

Food Wastage Footprint 2

This video from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations explains the full economic, environmental and social costs of food loss and waste.Filed under: Food waste, Video
Read More »

NASA Study Quantifies Plants’ Role in Mitigating Urban Heat Island Effect

NASA Study Quantifies Plants’ Role in Mitigating Urban Heat Island Effect

Via e360 Digest. The presence or scarcity of vegetation is an essential factor in determining how much urban areas heat up, according to a NASA study. Using data from...
Read More »

Here are some new tools to support local energy efficiency

Here are some new tools to support local energy efficiency

Read the full post from ACEEE. Each step of a home improvement project requires the right tool. If you are planning to put up a new set of cabinets,...
Read More »

Indonesian artist prepares another underwater reef-to-be

An Indonesian artist is preparing to put in place the second in a series of giant underwater installations meant to serve as a home for fish and raise awareness...
Read More »

Let’s See What Happens When This Group Of Scientists Retests Studies That Contradict Climate Science

Let’s See What Happens When This Group Of Scientists Retests Studies That Contradict Climate Science

​THINKPROGRESS: The scientific consensus behind man-made global warming is overwhelming: multiple studies have noted a 97 percent consensus among climate scientists that the Earth is warming and human activities...
Read More »

Fukushima nuclear waste detected along Southern California coast — Highest levels seen anywhere in North America since testing program began — 8.4 Bq/m3 of radioactive cesium measured near beach between Los Angeles and San Diego (VIDEO & MAP)

Fukushima nuclear waste detected along Southern California coast — Highest levels seen anywhere in North America since testing program began — 8.4 Bq/m3 of radioactive cesium measured near beach between Los Angeles and San Diego (VIDEO & MAP)

​ Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Center For Marine And Environmental Radiation: Location: 32°57’0.00″N; 117°17’60.00″W Sample Date: Apr 04, 2015 11:36...
Read More »

​Explosions rocked DuPont plant 50 years ago

​Explosions rocked DuPont plant 50 years ago

The day before, a series of explosions “turned the DuPont synthetic rubber plant in Louisville into an inferno of flame, smoke and flying pieces of metal,” the newspaper reported....
Read More »

Coca-Cola to Replenish 100% of Water It Uses by End of Year

Coca-Cola to Replenish 100% of Water It Uses by End of Year

BloomBerg: Coca-Cola Co. and its bottling partners expect to be replenishing 100 percent of the water used in their factories by the end of 2015, reaching a longstanding conservation...
Read More »

Carbon trading fails to reduce emissions, harms climate, study says – @willdizard

Carbon trading fails to reduce emissions, harms climate, study says – @willdizard

Because of bogus carbon offsets, European scheme to let polluters buy credits resulted in more harm to the environmentWilson Dizard @willdizard –  A United Nations-backed carbon-trading scheme in Europe,...
Read More »

Vacationing couple may have discovered a new dwarf lemur species

Dr. Charlie Gardner, a conservation researcher at the University of Kent, UK and his wife, Louise Jasper, a nature photographer, have lived on the island of Madagascar for a...
Read More »

Samsung unveils higher capacity Lithium ion batteries for electric bikes to provide 100 kilometer range in one charge

Samsung unveils higher capacity Lithium ion batteries for electric bikes to provide 100 kilometer range in one charge

Samsung unveils higher capacity Lithium ion batteries for electric bikes to provide 100 kilometer range in one charge Samsung SDI already had high capacity 2.9 Ah (29E) cells for...
Read More »

Pesticides linked to bee decline in major study

Pesticides linked to bee decline in major study

Gurdian Uk – A new study provides the first evidence of a link between neonicotinoid pesticides and escalating honeybee colony losses on a landscape level. The study found the increased...
Read More »

Air pollution kills 4,000 a day in China

Air pollution kills 4,000 a day in China

Tree Hugger – A new study by Berkeley Earth … that air pollution kills an average of 4000 people every day in China, 17% of all China’s deaths. For 38% of the...
Read More »

Industrial concessions causing massive deforestation in Cambodia

Land concessions for large-scale agricultural plantations are stripping off Cambodia’s forest cover, according to a new report by Forest Trends, a U.S.-based environmental protection group. By the end of...
Read More »

Many baby seals dying of leukemia-linked disorder along California coast — Blamed for over 1/3 of recent deaths at San Francisco Bay rescue center (CHART)

Many baby seals dying of leukemia-linked disorder along California coast — Blamed for over 1/3 of recent deaths at San Francisco Bay rescue center (CHART)


Read More »

Oil exploration plans in Argentine national park fuel local anger

Pedestrians forming the usual throng on Buenos Aires’ Calle Florida were surprised to encounter a large “oil drill” in the middle of the busy shopping street several weeks ago....
Read More »

​The archive link to the NORA Seminar, “Construction Safety and Health: A NIOSH Perspective”

​The archive link to the NORA Seminar, “Construction Safety and Health: A NIOSH Perspective”

​The archive link to the NORA Seminar, “Construction Safety and Health: A NIOSH Perspective” by Dr. Christine Branche, held August 19, 2015 is available. Click on the link below...
Read More »

Honeywell agrees to $13 million in improvements and $300,000 penalty in Hopewell spills.

Honeywell agrees to $13 million in improvements and $300,000 penalty in Hopewell spills.

Virginia’s environmental agency and Honeywell have reached an agreement that calls for the company to pay a $300,000 penalty and make more than $13 million in improvements at its...
Read More »

Environmental report says sage grouse still in danger from 27,000 oil and gas wells in Wyoming

Environmental report says sage grouse still in danger from 27,000 oil and gas wells in Wyoming

Despite efforts by the Obama administration to postpone oil and gas activity in the habits of the threatened greater sage grouse, the industry still has more than 27,000 wells...
Read More »

More from EHS News

EHS News Archives

Thank You for Contributing

Sharing is Caring: Our goal is to guide Environmental, Health and Safety professionals to the best EHS resources available. By bringing focus to leading sources of that information.

EHSnews.org is the first global aggregator of official Environmental, Health and Safety information in real-time that derives post excerpts.

ALL excerpts and content from contributors "shared" items require links to original articles and authors are to be included in ALL content.

PLEASE report any post or content not correctly citing original source and it will be remove immediately and contributor will be flagged.

Thanks - Editor

See Full Site Disclaimer Here