WHO, CDC publish grim new Ebola projections.

Six months after the World Health Organization was notified of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, its experts have released a new study warning that the situation is quickly growing worse and that Ebola may even "become endemic among the human population of West Africa, a prospect that has never previously been contemplated.”
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Obama: China must help lead against climate change.

President Barack Obama told a United Nations meeting on Tuesday that pollution must be contained to address climate change. Specifically, he called out China, saying that the most populous country with the fastest increase in carbon pollution must join the United States to lead the rest of the world in carbon reduction.
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How the hot and dry West is killing Rocky Mountain forests.

A new report summarizes how climate change is accelerating tree death from fires, bark beetles and drought.
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Indonesia: The real cost of gold.

Central Kalamantan province is home to some of Borneo’s richest gold deposits. And years of mining activity, lax enforcement of environmental laws, and regional officials willing to look the other way have wreaked havoc on delicate ecosystems and poisoned the landscape and watersheds with deadly mercury and other toxic chemicals.
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UN climate change summit: Stymied at home, Obama looks for climate support overseas.

When it comes to energy and climate policy, President Obama will likely have more luck reaching across borders than he will reaching across the aisle.
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Lobsters pack up and move north.

Climate changes have made scientists speculate about the possible future shift in range of many species, but in the ocean waters off the southern coast of New England, one major ocean species isn’t waiting for further changes – it’s already packed up and headed north, primarily for Canada.
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Look out below: Danger lurks underground from aging gas pipes.

About every other day over the past decade, a gas leak in the United States has destroyed property, hurt someone or killed someone. The most destructive blasts have killed at least 135 people, injured 600 and caused $2 billion in damages since 2004.
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Stockpiling coal for winter proves problematic for power plants.

Oil development is booming in the northern Rockies and Dakotas. But there aren’t enough pipelines to move it. So it’s being loaded onto hundreds of thousands of railcars instead. And that means fewer trains are available to move coal.
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Can batteries replace coal plants?

In 1997, when Dan Foley was managing Commonwealth Edison’s electrical grid, mornings meant firing up two coal-fired generating plants to keep pace with the sudden spike in electricity. Seventeen years later, Foley thinks he has the answer to scary mornings: batteries.
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Obama says "we have to do more" on climate change. So what would that entail?

On Tuesday, at the UN climate summit, President Obama said the United States had cut its carbon-dioxide emissions "more than any other nation on Earth" over the last eight years. "But," he added, "we have to do more." So what does "do more" entail, exactly?
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Flooding risk from climate change, country by country.

More than a quarter of Vietnam’s residents live in areas likely to be subject to regular floods by the end of the century. Across the globe, about one person in 40 lives in a place likely to be exposed to such flooding by the end of the century, absent significant changes.
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Dissolving pulp: The threat to Indonesia’s forests you’ve probably never heard of.

Pull out some of your favorite items of clothing, check the label, and if you see Rayon, viscose, modal, or tencel among the fabrics it’s made of, you’re wearing a textile made from dissolving pulp. And that could mean you’re wearing forest destruction.
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Efficiency is bigger new energy source than shale.

The United States is experiencing the largest and most sustained drop in oil demand since the start of the petroleum era in 1859 thanks to improvements in efficiency and the switch to alternative fuels.
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Marijuana harvest impacted by drought, raids.

An increasing number of people are growing pot these days, but the market has been booming just as California’s water supply has plummeted.
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Companies in Bakken shale fight limits on oil trains.

Executives from the top oil companies in the Bakken Shale told state regulators that their crude is safe to transport by train, opposing possible requirements that they make the oil less volatile before shipping it.
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Desert plan seeks to balance environment, renewable energy.

U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell on Tuesday unveiled a plan to manage both conservation and renewable energy production on more than 22 million acres in California – nearly one-quarter of the state – as part of a federal and state effort to promote clean energy production.
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Incorporating soil microbes in climate change models.

An estimated 2,500 billion metric tons of carbon is stored in the soil, so understanding interactions between the soil and the atmosphere is of critical importance to predicting the impacts of climate change.
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Coal trains stopped in UK and Poland protests.

In the UK, 50 Greenpeace activists stopped a train bound for a power station, to highlight the climate and health dangers of burning coal. Meanwhile in Poland, miners blocked a train entering from Russia, which they blame for flooding the market with cheap coal and destroying jobs.
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Proposal would send Wyoming wind energy to LA.

Four companies proposed an $8 billion project Tuesday that within a decade could send wind energy generated on the plains of Wyoming to power-thirsty households in Southern California.
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Global debate on climate change back on track at UN summit.

There were impassioned speeches, few new announcements and some no-shows, but the United Nations’ Climate Summit in New York City has advanced the prospects for a global warming deal in Paris next year, some observers say.
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Climate aid needed for 500 million small farmers-researchers.

As world leaders meet in New York for yet another climate change summit, concerns over wild weather patterns disrupting food supplies are increasingly finding their way to the table.
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Ten things in nature that could vanish before your kids see them.

In their losing battle with television and digital devices, conservationists have urged parents to get the kiddies to the great outdoors. But even if parents managed to pull their children away from cellphones, what would they find in America’s wilderness?
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Plan to disburse climate change funds challenged by Bay Area officials.

Bay Area public officials are challenging a state plan to spend hundreds of millions of dollars to fight climate change by cleaning the air in some of California’s poorest and most polluted communities, most of which are in Southern California.
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Brazil refuses to join pledge to end deforestation.

The US, Canada and European Union nations were among 30 states that agreed to halve forest loss by 2020 and work towards a 2030 goal. But Brazil, which owns the largest continuous rainforest on the planet, refused to sign because it could contravene national law.
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Climate Change Summit: World leaders reach fragile consensus on global warming.

World leaders arrived in New York today for a day dedicated to addressing arguably the gravest threat of all to peace and security – the sabotaging of the world’s fragile climate.
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Obama flexes US muscle in global climate fight.

The world’s largest economy and second-largest carbon emitter has begun to take action against a global climate crisis, President Obama told world leaders in a speech at the UN Climate Summit Tuesday. But the US must do more, he added, and cannot do it alone.
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UK warns that climate change could trigger violent conflict in India.

A British report has warned that climate change could trigger violent conflict in India – similar to the Arab Spring where climate change, drought, water mismanagement and food prices contributed to the outbreak of civil unrest.
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US vows to combat antibiotic resistance.

A push by the US government to stop the rise of antibiotic resistance has drawn broad praise from advocates who have long warned about this public-health threat. Some, however, are concerned that the plan might not do enough to curb the use of these drugs in livestock.
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Climate change will be solved in cities – or not at all.

As world leaders gather at the U.N. on September 23 to reiterate or reveal pledges for action to combat climate change, it is in cities that reductions to global warming pollution are actually happening.
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Chris Christie veers right on climate change as 2016 approaches.

Climate change is taking center stage once again – at the United Nations on Tuesday, and on the streets of New York City Sunday, where hundreds of thousands of activists marched to demand action. But across the Hudson River in New Jersey, there’s an environmental battle of a different kind being waged.
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Senate to vote on bill giving Vermont more authority to regulate toxic chemicals.

Federal regulations for reporting toxic chemicals in consumer products have not changed in decades, but Vermont is poised to join other states to label – and possibly ban – products containing chemicals considered harmful to public health.
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Paris car ban stopped after one day.

The French government has halted a controversial scheme to ban half of the traffic from Paris streets after a single day, claiming that the experiment aimed at curbing harmful pollution had been successful and that the vast majority of Parisians had co-operated.
Read More »

Hundreds of children diagnosed with lead poisoning in St. Louis each year.

The city of St. Louis, Missouri, has been working to reduce lead poisoning since the introduction of a lead program in the 1940s. But the danger of exposure still exists there, and screenings reveal more than a thousand cases of elevated blood lead levels each year.
Read More »

Cleanup of Silicon Valley Superfund site takes environmental toll.

Below some of the world’s most expensive real estate in Northern California, pipes and pumps suck thousands of gallons of contaminated water every hour from vast underground toxic pools.
Read More »

Nuclear watchdog puts two Kyushu reactors on shortlist for restart screening.

The government’s nuclear watchdog put two reactors on a shortlist for a final round of safety checks on March 13, moving a step closer to reviving the country’s nuclear industry, three years after the Fukushima disaster that led to the shutdown of all plants.
Read More »

Don't drink the water: West Virginia after the chemical spill.

After a toxic disaster contaminated their water, the people of Charleston, West Virginia, are wondering if what’s coming out of the taps is harmful. They’re not getting any good answers.
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Coca-Cola water bottling sparks national park concerns.

One of Coca-Cola Amatil’s bottled water product is made from water extracted from near Australia’s world heritage listed Springbrook National Park. Residents are concerned about the impact the operation is having on the surrounding environment.
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Advocates say there's one simple solution to health and energy woes in developing countries: The clean cookstove.

Nearly 3 billion people globally cook food and heat their home with simple, open-flame cookstoves, burning wood, coal, scraps of trash and generally anything that burns. The problem is that about 4 million die every year due to smoke exposure.
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End of Gulf ban allows BP to expand in familiar, lucrative territory,

Even as drilling for new oil in the Gulf of Mexico has made a robust return since the Deepwater Horizon rig disaster in 2010, BP has been in the unusual position of spectator. But that is likely to change next Wednesday, when the federal government auctions off the rights to new oil drilling sites.
Read More »

Facing millions in cuts, Environment Canada prepares to get lean.

The Harper government’s plan for Environment Canada, the department tasked with coordinating the country’s environmental policies and programs, involves millions of dollars in cuts and hundreds of job losses over the next three years.
Read More »

Tens of thousands sick due to haze.

The severe haze, which has blanketed Riau and other provinces in Sumatra over the past two months, has taken its toll on locals as thousands across the island suffer from various haze-related illnesses as the air quality continues to deteriorate.
Read More »

Low doses of a controversial insecticide may harm friendly insects.

For at least one member of a controversial class of insecticides, low doses may cause as much harm to nontarget insects as high doses do, according to a new study.
Read More »

The geography of autism.

Researchers have long known that autism is found in clusters. Now research has yielded a new clue. Autism is more common where there are higher rates of male genital malformations, which suggests the possible involvement of environmental contaminants. But some researchers remain skeptical.
Read More »

CDC issues antibiotic checklist for hospitals to reduce use.

More than half of all hospital patients receive an antibiotic, according to the CDC, which last week released an antibiotic prescribing checklist for hospitals in an effort to reduce antibiotic use and poor prescribing practices.
Read More »

H7N9 bird flu comes home to roost in China.

H7N9 avian influenza has returned to China with a vengeance, sickening 226 people and killing 72 so far this year, as the government girds for what is likely to be a long battle to contain what one World Health Organization official has labelled an "epidemic".
Read More »

Hearing on Hanford nuclear cleanup won't include key workers.

A Senate hearing on alleged retaliation against whistleblowers at a giant nuclear cleanup project is expected to go forward on Tuesday despite the absence of some potential key witnesses: the workers who were let go.
Read More »

Wisconsin study says untreated drinking water has more risk of illness.

Researchers have found that children living in central and northern Wisconsin communities that don’t disinfect their drinking water systems have a greater likelihood of contracting gastrointestinal illnesses than children who rely on other water systems.
Read More »

Pesticide blamed for deaths of hundreds of wild Australian birds.

A chemical used to control insects and non-native pest birds is likely to blame for the deaths of hundreds of wild birds in New South Wales, Australia.
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US nuclear agency hid concerns, hailed safety record as Fukushima melted.

In the tense days after a powerful earthquake and tsunami crippled the Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Japan on March 11, 2011, staff at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission made a concerted effort to play down the risk of earthquakes and tsunamis to America’s aging nuclear plants.
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High lead levels in soil near battery plant prompt health warnings.

Elevated levels of lead have been found in the soil of homes and a preschool near a battery recycling plant in Vernon, Calif., prompting officials to issue health warnings and order more testing in adjacent neighborhoods.
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Obesity boosts ovarian cancer risk, study finds.

Obesity is probably a factor in some of the almost 22,000 new diagnoses of ovarian cancer that will be handed out this year to American women, a new study says – adding ovarian cancer to a growing list of diseases linked to carrying far too much weight.
Read More »

California drought dries up hydro, but power stays on.

California’s record drought has parched crops, but hasn’t yet dimmed lights or choked the flow of electricity, even though the Golden State, with more than 300 dams, has long been a hydroelectricity leader among U.S. states.
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Africa to spew half world's particle pollution by 2030.

With its exploding urban population burning ever more coal and wood, Africa could contribute as much as 55 percent of the world’s particle pollutants by 2030, a study said Tuesday.
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Only two electric-cab drivers on the road in NYC.

Only seven of the more than 50,000 taxis and for-hire vehicles on the road in New York City were electric in 2013. Those seven include two expensive Teslas that now sit idle, three city taxis that have since been sidelined, and one cab that has to turn off its heat to save electricity.
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Dispute over Missouri cancer cluster.

Many people who live near Coldwater Creek in Missouri think it may be the site of a cancer cluster. Residents grew up along a creek contaminated by radioactive material, the result of uranium processing during World War II.
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Nuclear radiation found in British Columbia may pose health concerns.

A radioactive metal from the Fukushima nuclear plant disaster in Japan has been discovered in the Fraser Valley, causing researchers to raise the alarm about the long-term impact of radiation on British Columbia’s west coast.
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Invasive Asian carp found breeding in 'surprising' location.

One of the most reviled invasive fish in North America has been unexpectedly found in the upper Mississippi River, raising concern about its spread, federal scientists announced Tuesday.
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Tokyo radiation less than Paris’s three years after meltdown.

Atmospheric radiation levels in Tokyo are at the same level as before the Fukushima nuclear accident three years ago and are below those in Paris and London.
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BPA-free plastics may be less safe than those with chemical.

For Debra Berliner, the debate over using plastics in her home is manifested by a BPA-free plastic sippy cup her husband purchased for her 22-month-old son that remains opened but unused in a kitchen cabinet.
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New ozone-depleting gases found in atmosphere.

Scientists have found four new ozone-destroying gases in the atmosphere, most likely put there by humans in the last 50 years, despite a ban on these dangerous compounds.
Read More »

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"Obama Presses Chinese on Global Warming"

“UNITED NATIONS — President Obama, emboldened by his use of executive powers to fight climate change at home, challenged China on Tuesday to make the same effort to reduce...
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"Hollande Says France To Offer $1 Billion To Climate Fund for Poor"

“French President Francois Hollande on Tuesday announced that France will contribute $1 billion to a near-empty global fund to help poor countries adapt to the effects of climate change...
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"UN Climate Summit: China Pledges Emissions Action"

“China has pledged for the first time to take firm action on climate change, telling a UN summit that its emissions, the world’s highest, would soon peak.” Source: ,
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"Bonn to Istanbul to New York: World Mayors Unite to Save Climate"

“NEW YORK -– To combat climate change, a global Compact of Mayors from cities across the world was launched today at the UN Secretary-General’s Climate Summit today at UN...
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"Climate Change Called Public Health Threat By Medical Journal"

“Climate change poses risks to human health just as pollution and lack of sanitation did a century ago, says a medical journal editorial that details the potential harmful health...
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"Dire Predictions On Ebola's Spread From Top Health Organizations"

“Two of the world’s top health organizations released predictions Tuesday warning how bad the Ebola outbreak in West Africa could get.” Source: ,
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Google, GE, Others Fund Climate-Change Deniers in Congress: Report

“According to oft-cited statistics, climate scientists are 95%-99% certain of climate change – about as certain as they are of the link between smoking and lung cancer. Nonetheless, an...
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"U.S. Joins Other Nations in Deforestation Accord At UN Summit"

“Moving to halt a powerful contributor to climate change, the United States has joined more than 110 corporations, civil society groups and governments to launch a global initiative to...
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Residents at Risk When Train Crews Don't Know Chemical Cargoes

“At least 18 times in the past three years BNSF Railway freight trains rolled west out of Minneapolis pulling cars filled with hazardous chemicals that were not on the...
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"Warming Temperatures Threaten Fragile Balance in Canadian Arctic"

“Ellesmere Island, Nunavut — It’s August, and there’s snow on the ground. The six-week summer has already passed; our 24-hour daylight will drop to 16 in just a month’s...
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As World Warms And Debate Heats Up, Leaders Descend on NYC for Summit

“In a week that a massive march descended on New York City, in a summer scientists said was the hottest on record, and in a year U.S. officials are...
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Countries, Companies Mobilize on Carbon Pricing Ahead Of U.N. Summit

“The World Bank said Monday that 73 national and 11 regional governments and some 1,000 companies will join forces to push for policies setting a price on carbon emissions...
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"About 100 Climate Protesters Arrested in March on Wall Street"

“About 100 protesters were arrested on Monday in New York City during a demonstration that at one point blocked streets near the stock exchange to denounce what organizers say...
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Philanthropies And Investors Pledge $50 Billion Fossil Fuel Divestment

“The Rockefellers, who made their vast fortune on oil, and other philanthropies and high-wealth individuals on Monday will announce pledges to divest a total of $50 billion from fossil...
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U.S. Energy Infrastructure Revamp May Unlock $6 Trillion Market: Kerry

“U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry said Monday the United States could potentially unlock a $6 trillion energy market by revamping the country’s fractured electricity grid, a move that...
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"Six Energy Firms to Sign Pact to Cut Methane Emissions"

“NEW YORK — Six international energy companies have agreed to work to reduce emissions of methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in partnership with more than a dozen national governments...
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"Pomp, Little Action Expected At UN Climate Summit"

“New York City will be full of planet-saving pomp this coming week, but short on action to rescue the world.” Source: ,
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Google To Cut Ties With Rightwing Lobby Group Over Climate 'Lies'

“The internet giant Google has announced it is to sever its ties with an influential rightwing lobbying network, the American Legislative Exchange Council, accusing it of ‘lying’ about climate...
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"Watchdog Warns Nuke Weapon Sites at Risk From Natural Disasters"

“A nuclear watchdog is warning about “shortcomings” in emergency preparedness at nuclear weapons facilities around the country.” Source: ,
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Mexico Warns of Spilled Mine Contaminants in River Flowing Into Arizona

“TUCSON, Ariz. — Authorities are testing water from the San Pedro River in southern Arizona that may be contaminated with toxic waste that traveled north after a massive copper...
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"At March, Clarion Call for Action on Climate"

“Legions of demonstrators frustrated by international inaction on global warming descended on New York City on Sunday, marching through the heart of Manhattan with a message of alarm for...
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"Harper Government Tracking Hundreds of Peaceful Protests"

“A new Public Safety document obtained by a Member of Parliament reveals that the government has been keeping tabs on more than 600 protests, rallies and events across Canada...
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Push for New Pact on Climate Change Is Plagued by Old Divide of Wealth

The U.N. climate summit on Tuesday is likely to be plagued by old North-South divisions. Source: ,
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Rockefellers, Heirs to Oil Fortune, To Divest Charity From Fossil Fuels

“John D. Rockefeller built a vast fortune on oil. Now his heirs are abandoning fossil fuels.” Source: ,
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"Flame Retardant in Furniture Poses Danger, Duke Study Shows"

“Indications are growing that some of the most comfortable resting places in your home – your couch, your bed’s mattress – could be a health hazard.” Source: ,
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RT via @Sustainablog – Coffee Processing Wastewater: a Great Source of Energy

RT via @Sustainablog – Coffee Processing Wastewater: a Great Source of Energy

Sustainablog; What do you do with your coffee waste? You may add the grounds to your compost bin, or put them directly onto your roses and other plants as a fertilizer. If you’re...
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RT @Sustainablog – Geothermal Power Approaches 12,000 Megawatts Worldwide

RT @Sustainablog – Geothermal Power Approaches 12,000 Megawatts Worldwide

Sustainablog: In 2013, world geothermal electricity-generating capacity grew 3 percent to top 11,700 megawatts across 24 countries. Although some other renewable energy technologies are seeing much faster growth—wind power has expanded 21 percent...
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Britain's nuclear clean-up bill to soar by billions

Britain's nuclear clean-up bill to soar by billions

The Independent has an article on the UK’s ever increasing bill for cleaning up old nuclear power sites – Britain’s nuclear clean-up bill to soar by billions ‘because of Government...
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The Gulf Is Still So Far From Recovering. Just Ask This Oyster Farmer.

The Gulf Is Still So Far From Recovering. Just Ask This Oyster Farmer.

John Tesvich is a fourth-generation oyster farmer in Empire, a tiny Gulf Coast enclave south of New Orleans. He’s spent his life working in the rich oyster beds here,...
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If Tesla Can Run Its Gigafactory On 100% Renewables, Why Can't Others?

If Tesla Can Run Its Gigafactory On 100% Renewables, Why Can't Others?

Tesla CEO Elon Musk has said his company’s Gigafactory battery plant, the world’s largest, will be “self contained” and run on solar, wind and geothermal energy. The obvious problem...
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Replacing coal with biogas #renewable #energy

Replacing coal with biogas #renewable #energy

RNE has a look at some CEFC programs to increase the use of biogas in Australia – Major beef processor turns to biogas to halve power bills. One of Australia’s largest meat...
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Is Storage Necessary for Renewable Energy?

Is Storage Necessary for Renewable Energy?

Engineering.com has a look at an Amory Lovins presentation on our ability to switch to 100% renewable energy even without energy storage – Is Storage Necessary for Renewable Energy?. Physicist...
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Japan JV to build world’s largest floating solar array

Japan JV to build world’s largest floating solar array

RNE has an article on a Japanese plan to building a solar power plant offshore – Japan JV to build world’s largest floating solar array. A Japanese joint venture is...
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Grist's David Roberts is back from sabbatical, Reboot or Die Trying

Grist's David Roberts is back from sabbatical, Reboot or Die Trying

Grist’s David Roberts is back from sabbatical, with an article in Outside Online describing his year unplugged from blogging and social media – Reboot or Die Trying. As my mind began...
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It’s (still) a materialist world, F-150 pick-up, which is its most popular model today, weighs more than 2 tonnes.

It’s (still) a materialist world,  F-150 pick-up, which is its most popular model today, weighs more than 2 tonnes.

Singapore Today has an article on Vaclav Smil’s ideas about our dependence on large volumes of raw materials (in opposition to Bucky Fuller’s about ephermeralisation) – It’s (still) a...
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Newly-discovered waste-eating bacteria could help in nuclear waste disposal

Newly-discovered waste-eating bacteria could help in nuclear waste disposal

Gizmag Emerging Technology Magazine “Extremophile” bacteria have been found thriving in soil samples from a highly alkaline industrial site in Peak District of England. Although the site is not...
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U.S. Renewable Energy Growth in 2014 Dwarfs Fossil Fuel Plant Additions

U.S. Renewable Energy Growth in 2014 Dwarfs Fossil Fuel Plant Additions

The U.S. this year has significantly scaled back coal and natural gas power plant additions compared to 2013, Click to Enlarge 2014 power additions and solar and wind power...
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Oceans acidifying at fastest rate in 300 million years

Oceans acidifying at fastest rate in 300 million years

Vox – “The current rate of ocean acidification appears unprecedented at least over the last 300 million years,” noted a report this week from the World Meteorological Organization. “The...
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Solvents and microwaves to lower energy and cost of oilsand oil recovery and increase the oil recoverabe []

Solvents and microwaves to lower energy and cost of oilsand oil recovery and increase the oil recoverabe []

Next Big Future Using steam extraction for the oilsands means that nine-tenths of the land above a reservoir can be left intact. There is no need for waste ponds...
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Tesla Plans To Power Its Gigafactory With Renewables Alone

Tesla Plans To Power Its Gigafactory With Renewables Alone

In his press conference, Elon Musk stated that the factory will produce all of its own energy using a combination of solar, wind, and geothermal. Engineering.com looks at the feasibility...
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